20
Apr
08

Sphere Pattern

Hello All!

Here is the pattern I used to make my stockinette spheres. At the moment there are two sizes, but stay tuned for a third.

Yarn: Any, but this is a great project for stash-busting all those sock-yarn leftovers!
Gauge: Shouldn’t matter, but try not to make the fabric too loose, otherwise you’ll see the stuffing.

Small size (golf ball):
CO 16 stitches using a provisional cast-on (I used the Invisible Crochet cast-on II from Eunny’s blog).

Note: each row in this pattern ends with a wrap/turn/slip first stitch. Make sure the stitches on either side of this process are fairly tight, or you may end up with loose stitches.

Row 1: Slip 1 purlwise, K13, wrap yarn around next stitch, turn.*
Row 2: Slip 1 purlwise, P11, wrap next stitch, turn.
Row 3: Sl1 purlwise, K9, wrap & turn.
Row 4: Sl1 purlwise, P7, wrap & turn.
Row 5: Sl1 purlwise, K to end, knitting wraps with stitches.**
Row 6: Sl1 purlwise, P to end, knitting all wraps with stitches.
Repeat these 6 rows 7 more times (8 times in total), then move on to Finishing (below).

Medium size (cricket ball):
CO 31 stitches using a provisional cast-on (I used the Invisible Crochet cast-on II from Eunny’s blog).

Note: each row in this pattern ends with a wrap/turn/slip first stitch. Make sure the stitches on either side of this process are fairly tight, or you may end up with loose stitches.

Row 1: Slip 1 purlwise, K28, wrap yarn around next stitch, turn.*Brent\'s Balls
Row 2: Slip 1 purlwise, P26, wrap next stitch, turn.
Row 3: Sl1 purlwise, K24, wrap & turn.
Row 4: Sl1 purlwise, P22, wrap & turn.
Row 5: Sl1 purlwise, K20, wrap & turn.
Row 6: Sl1 purlwise, P18, wrap & turn.
Row 7: Sl1 purlwise, K16, wrap & turn.
Row 8: Sl1 purlwise, P14, wrap & turn.
Row 9: Sl1 purlwise, K11, wrap & turn.
Row 10: Sl1 purlwise, P8, wrap & turn.
Row 11: Sl1 purlwise, K to end, knitting wraps with stitches.**
Row 12: Sl1 purlwise, P to end, knitting all wraps with stitches.
Repeat these 12 rows 7 more times (8 times in total), then move on to Finishing.
Finishing
Cut yarn, leaving a long tail. Using a darning needle, thread the tail through the rear loop of each of the 8 selvedge stitches forming the ‘top’ of the sphere, repeat, and pull tight. Now use the kitchener stitch to graft the loops of the provisional cast-on to the live stitches still on the needle (don’t forget to insert stuffing/bell/polystyrene ball first!). Thread the remaining yarn through the rear loops of the 8 selvedge stitches at the opposite end, repeat, and pull tight. Use the remaining tail to hang up the sphere somewhere, or thread it through the sphere itself and cut off.

*To make a wrap, slip the next stitch purlwise onto the right needle, bring the yarn to the other side of the work (i.e. if you’re knitting, bring it to the front; if you’re purling, bring it to the back), put the stitch back onto the left needle, return the yarn to its proper side, and turn the work.

** To knit a wrap with a stitch, insert the needle under the wrap from front to back (when looking at the right side) or from back to front (when looking at the wrong side), then insert the needle into the stitch (either knitwise or purlwise, as required) and then knit the stitch and the wrap together.

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23 Responses to “Sphere Pattern”


  1. 1 Faye
    21 April, 2008 at 1:36 am

    Thanks Brent, you’re a real sweetie.

  2. 21 April, 2008 at 8:55 am

    “That’s not a landscape — that’s balls. You’re looking at balls.”

  3. 3 Bee
    20 May, 2008 at 7:29 pm

    I love this. I think when I get a bit of free time to do knit something different I will give this ago. This is something I could use with my work with children.

  4. 4 Elaine
    13 July, 2008 at 8:17 pm

    I love this idea!!! I’ve been wanting some large “Christmas bulbs” for the tree in my front yard and if the wind blows, glass is not a good choice. I think these would be perfect!!! If they are too small, I could use bulky yarn to make them bigger!!!

  5. 5 brentusfirmus
    24 July, 2008 at 12:29 pm

    You could do that. I’m also convinced it’s possible to insert a stripe of a different colour around the circumference using entrelac. This would mean casting on and kitchenering in two colours, but I think it can be done. Care to try it out?

  6. 6 Estelle
    6 August, 2008 at 8:16 am

    Knitted Christmas ornaments were my gift to most of my knitting friends last year. It is a great gift, and, you are right, a great way to use up some of those embarrassing novelty yarns as a center stripe that seemed so great at the time… Sort of like Sr. Seuss “grinch” ornaments!

    I will let you know how it compares to my north and south of the equator increase/decrease technique.

  7. 7 Marsicanusbear
    4 November, 2009 at 10:43 am

    Hello and thanks for sharing this great project!

  8. 6 May, 2011 at 12:57 pm

    Congratulations, great website.

  9. 9 jenny
    22 October, 2012 at 3:17 pm

    i love this pattern. i first found it years ago and its helped me a lot.

  10. 10 Anonymous
    5 November, 2012 at 7:39 pm

    This pattern is perfect for making round toes (for toe-up socks) and I thought of just so many things it could be used for as I was making the sphere and I just love it. :D

  11. 10 April, 2013 at 8:03 pm

    Thanks. This is great.

  12. 16 April, 2013 at 1:18 am

    When I originally commented I clicked the “Notify me when new comments are added” checkbox and
    now each time a comment is added I get several emails with the same comment.

    Is there any way you can remove me from that service?

    Cheers!

  13. 12 May, 2013 at 4:03 pm

    Thanks for giving the sizes in this way! I have no idea what an X” diameter sphere is – but I know *exactly* how big a cricket ball is!

  14. 14 May, 2013 at 5:46 am

    It’s an awesome post in support of all the web visitors; they will take benefit from it I am sure.

  15. 20 September, 2013 at 1:15 pm

    I absolutely love your site.. Very nice colors & theme.

    Did you create this web site yourself? Please reply back as I’m
    attempting to create my own site and would like to learn where you got this from
    or what the theme is called. Thanks!

  16. 6 October, 2014 at 2:27 am

    Hi! This is my first visit to your blog! We are a group of volunteers and starting a new initiative in a community in the same niche.
    Your blog provided us beneficial information to work on. You have done a
    marvellous job!


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